MBM - Burda 107-07-2008, Black Linen Dress

Man alive, summer's arrived. So hot. All I want to wear are clothes that are loose, unstructured and COOL. Made in a fabric that breathes. Like linen.
I had a length of black linen that I had meant to make into pants. Except when I brought the linen home it was a little too lightweight for the pants I had in mind. That's what happens when you speed-fabric shop. Nice dress weight, though, but I only had slightly over 2 metres so options would be limited.
It didn't take too long to uncover Burda 107 from July 2008 from the stash, which fit the bill nicely. Here's the  tech drawing:

I'd made the top version of this pattern twice before, and was really happy with the shape, so it seemed perfect for the loose, casual dress I had in mind.
 
 
Not much to daunt about this pattern, although the method I used to do the yoke probably isn't orthodox. It certainly bears no relation to what Burda was trying to get me to do.
Even though I'd inserted an invisible zipper into opposing seams and made in-seam pockets before, I found Carolyn's instructions for doing both really helpful in refining my technique, and both turned out well. You can find the instructions here and here. Thank you, Carolyn.
 
 
The back view. Yep, it's loose and unstructured all right. And that's New South Wales Christmas bush in the background lending a festive touch.
 
This dress is the third black item I've made this year. Before that, I hadn't worn black since the early 1990s, when just about everyone did, all the time. I'm not sure why the sudden interest in black, especially as every style advice you read tells you to stay away from it as you get older.  I don't think I look all that great in black, but for some reason I'm drawn to make and wear it. Anyone else have some insight into wearing black? Agree that black doesn't do older women any favours, disagree, or agree but plough on with black regardless?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Comments

  1. I love the dress- it looks great in black and it looks great on you. I've heard all that same advice about black, too, and I just ignore it. Sometimes I wear black just for the attitude or the statement it makes. No other color has the same impact. If you're drawn to it, go ahead and make it and wear it, and enjoy it. You look great!

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    1. Hi Shannon, thanks for your comment.
      I think you've nailed the reason why we wear black. No other colour can what black does, really.

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  2. I like the black on you, but you could try a colourful necklace so the black isn't the closest colour to your face.

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    1. Hi Sue - I do agree that this dress's neckline is crying out for a colourful necklace.

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  3. I still wear black too. I like the dress on you. I've ignored this pattern, and now I see that I should not have!
    -sewingelle

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    1. Thanks, sewingelle. Hope to see this on your blog one day, too!

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  4. Lovely cool and comfy looking dress. The linen sounds nice to wear too. This dress would be perfect for concealing all the over indulging that's bound to happen over Christmas.

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    1. Absolutely - this dress is ideal Christmas pudding wear!

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  5. Hello Paola, my daughter sent me a picture of you in your black linen dress as she knows that I hate wearing tight clothes or anything that is clingy and rubs skin. I also HATE elastine in fabrics as I find it makes clothing very hot like wearing a plastic bag!! the pattern of this dress is really lovely, giving the illusion or shape without being clingy at all.
    The question about black is a really interesting one also. A bit like "blue and green should never be seen" or "pink and red should never be worn together". Black can be worn by anyone who has naturally black or blue black hair. these people usually have milky-white coloured skin or a very dark olive skin and whose hair often goes steel-grey or very white early in life. All others have to be very careful wearing black as it can make them look drawn and tired in the face, purely because the colour of our clothes reflects on the skin. If anyones skin colour is more orangy, apricot or salmon-pink or creamy rather than bluish-white or bluish-pinkor bluish olive, when they compare skin colour with others, ( especially doing this colour test on palms and toes, when one is warm or has just got out of bed in the morning) then best practice is never to wear black as it does not reflect well against what is termed "golden skin colour". They look much better in dark chocolate brown or dark,clear navy-blue. Having said this, there there are a few people with strong, natural strawberry blonde, copper or auburn hair who can look stunning in black at times, but they have to be careful that it doesn't over power they whole look and make their face skin colour look pasty and grey compared to their natural glowing creamy-apricot or salmon-pink skin colour.
    This is a very wordy explanation, and is hard to explain without being able to show you examples of skin colours in relation to what colour one wears and how it affects one..........Leigh.

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    1. Thanks for your time in commenting on the very interesting area of colour, Leigh.
      Since making this dress, I've come to realise that my light olive skin really does not benefit from wearing black. I tend to have dark circles under my eyes, even when I'm not tired, and black really highlights them! As you say, I'm much better in a chocolate brown, or even a dark aubergine. Suffice to say, this dress has been retired, simply because of the colour. The dress itself was great to wear on hot summer days (although if I make this dress again, I'd adjust the neckline around the shoulders to bring them in a bit. The dress shifts around, and I was prone to bra-strap show with this).

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