MBM - Tessuti Bondi dress

It’s been a long, hot summer here. When I started on this dress a few weeks ago, I had my doubts that I’d be wearing it much, if at all, before next summer. I needn’t have worried. The days are shorter, but still pretty hot, so there has been scope to wear a dress like Tessuti Bondi.
This is the description of the Bondi from the Tessuti website:
this sleeveless dress features a high neckline, cut away armholes, bust darts, side pockets, centre front/back seam and back yoke with neck opening. The gently flared hem is finished with a facing and an optional fringe edging. This perfect summer style comes with two length options (longer length A and shorter length B).
I chose to make the longer length, and include the fringe edging.
My first concern in making this was whether those cut away armholes would be bra friendly. I compared the draft to an earlier make, Tessuti Kate, which seemed to me to feature a pretty similar armhole. By my reckoning they were almost identical, so no alterations required there.
The second step was to lengthen the pattern. Even though I chose the longer length, that was still above my knee. Trust me, no one needs to see my knees in the wild, so I added 7cm length. This necessitated also altering the hem facings to take into account the extra width involved in lengthening the dress.
I then dropped the bust dart about an inch, and did a 1” FBA.
When it came to trying on the dress during construction, I found I had heaps of extra room under the arms. I really wanted to achieve that trim fit through the upper back and chest. To achieve that, I reckon I took in at least 2 inches on each side, tapering to seam to the top of the pocket. I might have overdone it a bit, but the crinkle linen I was using has some inherent ease in it, so I erred on the side of caution.
The trickiest bit of construction for me was the hem facing, probably made a bit more problematic due to the fact that I used a toning bit of cotton shirting for the facing, as I didn’t have quite enough fabric. That inherent ease in the main fabric seems to fight to the firm weave of the cotton. You can see how there seems to be a ridge at hemline level. Also, the hem is gently curved and I had to give sewing the hem facing down a couple of goes. Looks like I’ll need to give it another bash – there’s a bit of bobbling at the front hem still.
Yes, the bobbling is still there.

I’m a bit of a fan of the Tessuti pattern. I personally like their design aesthetic, and their instructions are fantastic. They also give instructions that take the finish of the garment up a notch. I regularly use techniques I pick up from Tessuti when making patterns from other companies.


 I am pretty happy with the dress I’ve ended up with, and sadly, the weather forecast is such that it  looks like I’ll have further opportunity to wear it in the near future. Can’t wait for some cooler weather.

Comments

  1. Lovely dress. I’ve become a tessuti pattern convert too. That is, when I’m not sewing Burda!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Lovely dress I though the hem part looked like a desgn feature along with the frayed hem. I love picking up new sewing techniques you don't find elsewhere. The hot dry weather is a worry. It seems like the northern hemisphere is having the opposite problem.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Beautiful dress and I'm sure you will be wearing it again this week.

    ReplyDelete

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